If It Ain’t Baroque

Baroque Pearl Insights from Spey Jewelry of Washington, DC
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When one thinks of pearls, one often thinks of pristine, perfectly matched rows of glistening white spheres. And yes, this uniformity is certainly a hallmark of a strand of lustrous Spey pearls. Sometimes, however, a lady of discerning taste might require a pearl necklace of unique proportion and character. At times such as these, we turn to the fascinating multidimensionality of baroque pearls.

So named for their fascinating detail and more ornate structure, baroque pearls are defined by their asymmetrical shape. Three major categories of pearl shape help organize the pearl jewelry industry: spherical (round or near-round pearls), symmetrical (pearls that have mirrored halves, like the shape of a teardrop, oval or button); and baroque.

What baroque pearls lack in uniformity, they gain in charisma and originality. Each pearl has a personality of its own. What’s more, the peaks and craters of these pearl’s surface create deep pools of nacre, thereby enriching overall luster and fiery iridescence. This phenomenon is most acute in the enigmatic Tahitian (black) pearls.

Baroque pearls are becoming more and more popular on the market, particularly because they enable a larger, more lustrous pearl at a more introductory price point. Why is this? It may take years to assemble a strand of perfectly matched, brilliantly lustrous pearls of perfect roundness. With one-of-a-kind baroque shapes, a necklace may be composed in relatively less time.

These varied shapes exist because the pearl is a natural product. When an irritant enters the shell of a mollusk, the creature begins to wrap the intrusion in layers of protective nacre. Over time, this forms the queen of gems: the pearl. But a perfectly round pearl (indeed, the creation of a pearl, at all), is a very rare process. If a pearl is formed, it is far more likely to be off-round or baroque in shape.

This organic process may create pearls of truly exceptional personality. One might study why pearls are round, or what creates those fascinating rings or bands around some baroque pearls, but all may appreciate the alluring beauty of the one-and-only baroque pearl. Interested in a strand of your own? Drop us a note and we’ll set to work creating a strand worthy of the name Spey.